Bloomberg, Cuomo and Stewart Announce Plans for a Permanent Dedication to 9/11 Rescue and Recovery Workers

Bloomberg, Cuomo and Stewart Announce Plans for a Permanent Dedication to 9/11 Rescue and Recovery Workers

The permanent dedication will be located on the Memorial Glade. Photo by Jin Lee, 9/11 Memorial

A permanent dedication at the 9/11 Memorial to recognize the rescue and recovery at Ground Zero is being planned and developed, 9/11 Memorial & Museum Board Chairman Michael R. Bloomberg, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and board member Jon Stewart announced Tuesday.

New York State, through its affiliates, and Bloomberg Philanthropies will provide support and funding for the permanent dedication that will be located on the Memorial Glade, the grassy clearing on the southwest corner of the 8-acre plaza near the Survivor Tree.

For several months, memorial and museum officials have been exploring creating a commemorative space and walkway to recognize rescue and recovery workers.

The memorial and museum will lead in the planning, design and development of the dedication with the memorial’s architects, including Michael Arad. The dedication would expand on existing exhibitions and programming that examine the impact the 9/11 disaster had on the health of those who were exposed, including first responders, workers, survivors, residents and others.

"Thousands of people converged at the World Trade Center site immediately after the attacks to show the world that our city and our country were not defeated," said Bloomberg, New York City's 108th mayor, who led the revitalization of lower Manhattan after 9/11. "We owe these men and women of the recovery a great debt of gratitude and they deserve a fitting tribute for their courage, sacrifice and bravery."

"Fifteen years after 9/11, we still feel the pain and loss as if it were yesterday," Gov. Cuomo said. "This tribute will be a poignant reminder of the selflessness and courage of our first responders, who embody the best values of New Yorkers, and ensure that their sacrifice will never be forgotten."

Cuomo, 9/11 victims' family members, 9/11-health advocates and others are lending their support. "After the towers fell, and before the dust cloud settled, these remarkably brave men and women risked their lives, and health, as they joined the response and helped start the process of recovery," 9/11 Memorial & Museum President and CEO Alice M. Greenwald said. "We should always remember what they endured in the aftermath of the attacks as they paved the way for this city and our country to rebuild."

Today, the memorial and museum honors the men and women of the nine-month rescue and recovery effort as part of a week-long tribute commemorating the 15th anniversary of May 30, 2002, which marked the formal end of recovery operations at the World Trade Center.

The commemoration includes a special ceremony in the museum near the Last Column, the final steel beam ceremonially removed from Ground Zero when recovery operations ended. Culminating in a moment of silence to remember those who have succumbed to 9/11-related illnesses, the event will conclude with participants tying ribbons at the base of the Last Column.

For more information about the week of dedicated programs and commemorative activities please check here

By 9/11 Memorial Staff