The Lens: Capturing Life and Events at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum

Three high school students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School visit the Museum. One of the students has his arm around another as they face away from the camera. The backs of their red letterman jackets read “Eagle Regiment.”
Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School visited the 9/11 Memorial & Museum as part of a visit to New York City. Photo by Monika Graff, 9/11 Memorial.

The Lens: Capturing Life and Events at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum is a photography series devoted to documenting moments big and small that unfold at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum.

The View: 

A group of 55 students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the school in Parkland, Fla., where 17 people were killed by a gunman on Feb. 14, 2018, visited the 9/11 Memorial & Museum yesterday morning.

After being selected to perform at Carnegie Hall for a high school band showcase concert, the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School wind symphony traveled to New York City for a five-day trip of sightseeing and visits to cultural institutions throughout the city.

The 9/11 Memorial & Museum tour was already planned as part of the trip, but the visit took on a new meaning following the tragic shooting at the high school in February. Two members of the marching band, Alex Schacter and Gina Montalto, were killed in the shooting.

Before the group toured the Museum, the students were greeted by 9/11 Memorial Museum President and CEO Alice M. Greenwald and Howard Lutnick, board member and the chairman of Cantor Fitzgerald, who shared his own story of personal loss and recovery.

The students were presented with an American flag that had been flown over the 9/11 Memorial, as well as a certificate indicating that a cobblestone on the Memorial plaza will be dedicated to the 17 people who lost their lives in the shooting.

By 9/11 Memorial Staff

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